Other Producers

Michel Magnien Clos de la Roche Grand Cru 2017

R3,995

A biodynamic pioneer in the Cote de Nuits, delivering a beautifully concentrated and complex Clos de la Roche

Only 6 left in stock

Additional information

Additional information

Critics Top Rating

94 points

Curated Selection

NEW, Top Rated, Organic & Biodynamic

Grape Variety

Pinot Noir

Producer

Other Producers

Product Type

Red Wine

Vintage

2017

Wine Group

Prestige

Wine Occasion

Indulgence, Icon & Invest

Wine Region

Burgundy

Story

Story

Born into a family which had produced several generations of wine growers , Michel MAGNIEN created a large part of the domaine between 1967 and 1991, with the acquisition of numerous plots in the finest climats of the Côte de Nuits. Frédéric Magnien, representing the 5th generation, joined the family domaine situated in Morey-Saint-Denis, in 1993, and is working towards the bottling of the entire production. The domaine now covers 19 hectares with some 20 appellations, including exceptional wines: Clos de la Roche, Clos Saint-Denis, Charmes-Chambertin as well as several Gevrey-Chambertin, Morey-Saint-Denis and Chambolle-Musigny Premier Crus. Since the 2013 vintage, all the domaine’s wines are certified organic by Ecocert. In addition, all the vines are worked according to biodynamic principles. The aim of biodynamics is to energize and build organic life in the environment in which the vine lives.
Clos de la Roche Grand Cru
First mentioned as far back as 1120, fourteenth century Morey was a place of asylum for Cistercian monks who appeared to have possessed numerous vineyards and even a winery by 1306. The appellation extends from Chambolle-Musigny to Gevrey-Chambertin and covers around 148 hectares, 80% of which are planted with grapes for red wines. In the 19th century, Clos de la Roche vineyard only covered “4 hectares 57 ares 40″. When the AOC was created in 1936, it grew to around 15 hectares as it included the local areas known as” Les Mochamps”, “Les Froichots”, “Les Fremières”, “Les Chabiots” and the lower part of “Monts Luisant”s. In 1971 the area increased to nearly 17 hectares when “Les Genavrières” was added.

Specifications

Specifications

Our plot is located next to Clos Saint Denis in the upper part of the village. The vine is planted on brown limestone soils, on the bedrock.

Wines are increasingly aged in Terracotta amphorae in 2 formats for all their wines. Morey St Denis half in oak barrels. After one year, the wines are racked to tanks to free the amphorae for the next vintages.

Tasting Notes

Tasting Notes

Clos de la Roche Grand Cru gives the biggest and most structured wine of Morey-Saint-Denis’ five grand crus thanks to its meager top soil and limestone bedrock. The vines here are in contact with the rock, resulting in a muscular wine with intense flavors of fruit and minerals. The wine is a pure expression of its terroir thanks to its élevage in a combination of used oak and clay jars.

Deep color and an intense aroma of dark fruit suggest a wine of volume and concentration. Black cherries, licorice, and sandalwood combine with floral and herbal notes on the nose. Rich and concentrated fruit flavors on the palate are accompanied by firm tannins and a lingering mineral finish.

 

Critic Ratings

Critic Ratings


Burghound – 94 points (2013)

Deep red, the least ruby of these 2013s but still bright and dark. A hint of yeasty reduction to the aromas of musky black raspberry, dark chocolate and spicy underbrush. A wine of outstanding complexity and energy, with its dark berry fruit complicated by notes of iron and earth. Less thick than the Clos Saint-Denis but juicier. Finishes very long, with suave, seamless tannins.


Wine Advocate – 90-92 pts (2013)

Michel Magnien is the domaine side of the namesake’s Morey-based operation, Frédéric Magnien being the négoçiant side (see separate entry.) His wines had not been reviewed in this publication, so I visited Michel in late August. Therefore, they represent some of the first 2013s that I tasted, alongside the 2012s, that I will report on in the future. “I want to make wine with grapes that I can eat,” Michel explained as I started tasting through their comprehensive portfolio (one assumes he spends much time in the vineyard nibbling the berries.) I asked Michel if there was a comparison he could make between 2013 and another vintage? “Maybe like 1993,” he answered before furnishing me with further information. “The harvest started two days too late. I was among the first to start, which was four days after Lalou Bize-Leroy, around 29 or 30 September. We lost some grapes at the end because of rot. I had to chaptalize 1% and I didn’t want to push it further than that.” I asked Michel if the style of his wines has changed in recent years? “I used to have problems with reduction between 2001 and 2008, perhaps a little in 2010, but now it is fine,” he replied candidly. “The winemaking style has changed – the fruit is now more on the black side. We used to destem 100%, but now I have come back to a soft destemming and more whole bunch. When I use whole bunch, punching down is by foot so there is no green character. The stems is just to give more oxygen in the wine and to irrigate the cap.” So as we can see, there has been a shift in style at Michel Magnien and I think for the better compared to the wines I was tasted several years ago.

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